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Archive for July, 2017

Another month has passed, and that means it’s time for me to talk about the books I especially enjoyed this month.

The first one I’m going to talk about is Seanan McGuire’s Sparrow Hill Road:  Rose Marshall’s life ended when Bobby Cross ran her off the road; now she hitchhikes across the United States, protecting travelers and guiding those whom she can’t save to the afterlife.  As her reputation grows, Rose appears in a variety of ghost tales and legends. However, Bobby Cross still stalks the roads, and Rose decides to take matters into her own hands.  Seanan McGuire has created a compelling story that winds its way through a unique ghostly ecosystem.   For those who find some of McGuire’s other works too brief, this one might satisfy their need for longer works from this author.

Next up is Sarah Beth Durst’s The Lost.  One day, Lauren drives straight instead of taking the turn and drives until she ends up in the town of Lost.  The desolate Lost is filled with individuals seeking what they’ve lost, but never getting anywhere.  With responsibilities weighing heavily on her, Lauren tries to leave only to find she can’t. In order to leave, Lauren will have to figure out what she lost.  This story has a compelling, eerie setting, and Durst uses it well as she unfolds an intriguing, relatable, and creepy story.

As a librarian and bibliophile, I was compelled to pick up Anders Rydell’s The Book Thieves.  The Book Thieves: The Nazi Looting of Europe’s Libraries and the Race to Return A Literary Inheritance tells the story of the fate of many of the Jewish libraries throughout Europe.  Over the course of the book,  Anders Rydell traces the likely fate of these collections through the War and after the fact. Ryell’s descriptions of how the Nazis pillaged the libraries and separated the materials before reforming them collections meant to serve Nazi goals is disturbing.  Even as Rydell tells this story of the destruction of the original libraries, he also discusses the efforts to return books to the original owners or their descendants. Librarians and book lovers with a taste for history should find this equal parts fascinating and sad.

My Favorite Thing is Monsters follows Karen, a girl who fills her days documenting her favorite monsters and her life in her notebook .  After  the lady upstairs, Anka, dies mysteriously, Karen decides to investigate Anka’s story.  As she uncovers the story of Anka, Karen comes to learn secrets about others around her and discover things about herself. My Favorite Thing is Monsters is an intriguing graphic novel from newcomer Emil Ferris; with its wonderful colored pencil  illustrations and unique story, this coming of age tale will be sure to fascinate.

In Angie Thoma’s The Hate U Give, Starr lives two lives: she attends a college preparatory school, but she still lives in one of the poorer Black neighborhoods.  She keeps these two lives separate until, one day, a cop murders her childhood friend, Khalil, As speculation swirls and loyalties are tested, Starr will have to navigate her grief and an increasingly dangerous situation in order to find her voice.  The Hate U Give’s well-developed cast and strong interpersonal relationships are the story’s backbone, and the author successfully  highlights the racism and socioeconomic issues that confront this country in an approachable way.  I’m looking forward to seeing more from Angie Thomas.

When I saw that Janet Mock’s new memoir, Surpassing Certainty: What My Twenties Taught Me, was out, I immediately acquired a copy.  In this memoir, Mock  explores her first love and marriage, and her journey to break into journalism. Mock’s insights, delivered in a conversational style, make this a swift, engaging read, and readers who enjoyed Mock’s first memoir, Redefining Realness, will likely enjoy this one as well.  

That’s all, folks!  Catch you next month!

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