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Archive for May 2nd, 2017

Another month has come and gone, and I’m back with my favorite books of the month.

Queen of Blood (Durst):  In Renthia, a Queen, a woman with the power to keep the spirits in check, brings balance to the country for as long as she is able.  The current queen Fara is powerful, yet the spirits still harm her subjects.  Daleina, a young, weak student, and her mentor, a crusty knight, struggle to bring balance to the kingdom, but, in doing so, uncover a dark secret.  I really enjoyed Daleina as a character; she is aware of her faults, but learns to work with them–something I deeply respect.  The story is also extremely compelling with lots of twists and turns–I will be watching out for the sequel.

Hillbilly Elegy (Vance):  Hillbilly Elegy has been getting a lot of recognition, and it’s well deserved. In this memoir, J.D. Vance describes his family’s history and the experience of growing up in a hillbilly family and how he managed to escape the vicious cycle of poverty that traps so many.  He also ruminates on what the hillbilly community needs to do to move out of the vicious cycle of poverty and addiction.  This is an essential read for anyone trying to understand the needs of marginalized communities.

The Stone Heart (Nameless City #2-Hicks): The sequel to Nameless City begins where Nameless City left off: the General of All Blades is working to establish the council, but other members of the Dao occupation are reluctant to give up power.  Meanwhile Kai and Rat uncover a secret the Monks of the Stone Heart have protected for centuries, and this is one that could change everything.  The Stone Heart was just as compelling as The Nameless City, and Faith Erin Hicks’ full-color illustrations excel at portraying the world and the characters’ personalities.  Fans of Avatar the Last Airbender series and stories that talk about difficult issues in lighter ways will enjoy this graphic novel series.

In the Garden of Beasts:Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin (Larson):  Nonfiction writer Eric Larson tells the story of  William E. Dodd, the American ambassador to Hitler’s Germany.  Larson takes the reader through Dodd’s experiences navigating encounters with key Nazi officials while dealing with the power struggles and indifference to the results of Nazis’ hateful rhetoric from home.  Given that we all know the end of the story, this is a fascinating and accessible look at individual and national response to a crisis in the making.

That’s all!  Catch you next time!

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